Election News

Overview and Live Results: Alaska At-Large Congressional Special Primary

Voters in Alaska have a lot of options from which to choose as they cast their ballot in the all-party primary for the state's at-large congressional district. The seat became open for the first time in nearly half a century when Republican Don Young died in March.

The primary has been conducted largely by mail, with ballots sent to registered voters in late April. Those must be postmarked on or before Election Day, Saturday, June 11. Any ballots that meet that criteria that are received by June 21 will be counted.

There are in-person polling places available on Election Day. The latest of these close at 8:00 PM Alaska Time (midnight Eastern). Live results will appear below after that time, although with the extended window to receive mail ballots, it may be a while before the outcome is known.

48 candidates are on the ballot. The list includes 16 Republicans, 6 Democrats, and 4 from third parties. The remaining 22 filed as either nonpartisan or undeclared. The top four finishers will advance to the August 16 special general election, which will use ranked choice voting to determine a winner. That person will serve until the end of the year, completing Young's term.

Listed below are some prominent candidates, with party affiliation, if the candidate filed with one. To the right of the name is the percentage support the candidate saw in an early May poll from Alaska Survey Research.  

Sarah Palin (R) 19% Former Alaska governor and 2008 Republican vice presidential nominee.
Nick Begich III (R) 16% From a prominent, mostly Democratic, Alaska political family. His grandfather, Nick Begich Sr. (D) preceded Don Young in the House; a plane he was on vanished in October, 1972
Al Gross 13% Orthopedic surgeon. Running as an independent, he was the 2020 Democratic U.S. Senate nominee, losing to incumbent Dan Sullivan (R).
Santa Claus  6% Councilman in North Pole, Alaska. Good name recognition. 
Chris Constant (D) 5% Member of the Anchorage Assembly.
Mary Peltola (D) 5% Former State Representative.
Josh Revak (R) 4% State Senator and co-chair of Young's 2022 reelection campaign.
Tara Sweeney (R) 4% Co-chair of Young's 2022 reelection campaign.
Jeff Lowenfels 3% Long-time gardening columnist for Anchorage Daily News.
John Coghill (R) 2% Former State Senator
Andrew Halcro 2% Former State Representative
Adam Wool (D) 2% State Representative
Emil Notti (D) 0% Lost in the 1973 special election that elected Don Young. Now 89, he's giving it another try.

August 16 is also the same date as the statewide primary, where voters will separately choose four nominees for the full two-year term to be contested in November's general election. Filing recently completed for that election, with 31 candidates certified. 24 of these are also on Saturday's ballot, including all the candidates in the above list except for Claus, Halcro, and Notti. Note that candidates can withdraw from the August primary up through June 25, so it is possible the list will shrink after the result of Saturday's primary is known. 

 

California Elections Highlight Busy Primary Day; Seven States Hold Nominating Contests

Tuesday is the busiest day on the primary calendar, with seven states holding contests. Much of the focus will be on California.

On this page, we'll provide an overview of a few races of interest. Use the links below to see all results. Latest poll closing (Eastern Time) appears below the state name. If you are voting in one of these states, check with your polling place as the hours may differ.

California >> Iowa >> Mississippi >> Montana >> 
11:00 PM  9:00 PM 8:00 PM 10:00 PM
New Jersey >> New Mexico >> South Dakota >> Special Elections >>
8:00 PM 9:00 PM 8:00 PM* Mayoral Primaries >>

*Mountain Time Zone locations close at 9:00 PM Eastern

U.S. Senate

California, Iowa, and South Dakota have elections this year. At this point, forecasters see all three incumbents as safe in the general election. There's an unusual situation in California which we discuss below. In the end, however, Democrat Alex Padilla is expected to win a full term. Republican John Thune should easily win a 4th term in South Dakota. Republican Chuck Grassley is favored to win an 8th term in Iowa.

California x2 (All Party)

Incumbent Alex Padilla (D) was appointed by Gov. Gavin Newsom (D) in January 2021, after Kamala Harris (D) resigned to become Vice-President. However, under a new law, Padilla cannot complete Harris' term as an appointed Senator. As a result, there are two primary elections for Senate on Tuesday's ballot. The regular one for the six-year term beginning in January, 2023, and a special primary for the lame duck session after the November elections.

Normally in California special elections, if a candidate gets a majority of the vote in the top two primary, they are elected. That is not the case with this Senate special; the top two finishers will advance to the November 8 general special election regardless of the vote distribution.

Iowa (Democratic)

While the winner will have an uphill battle against Grassley, this primary has become much more competitive. Former Rep. Abby Finkenauer was the early frontrunner, but the momentum may be with retired Navy Admiral Mike Franken. He was the largest fundraiser in the campaign's closing weeks. An early May poll showed the two in a statistical tie. Note that it was a Franken internal poll: while it may prove accurate, caution is warranted. This is Franken's second Senate run, he lost the nomination for the state's other seat to Theresa Greenfield in 2020.

Governor

California, Iowa, New Mexico, and South Dakota governorships will be contested this year. Only New Mexico looks competitive in November. Gavin Newsom (CA, D) and Kristi Noem (SD, R) are both heavily favored to win a 2nd term. In Iowa, Republican Kim Reynolds is also seen as safe by most forecasters.

New Mexico (Republican)

Democrat Michelle Lujan Grisham is seeking a 2nd term; she is unopposed for renomination. Five Republicans are seeking to challenge her; the frontrunner appears to be Mark Ronchetti, who was the party's nominee for U.S. Senate in 2020. Most forecasters rate the general election as Leans or Likely Democratic.

U.S. House

California District 22 Special General Election

This first result is for the special general election to fill the vacancy created when Republican Devin Nunes resigned at the end of last year. No candidate received a majority in the April 5 primary, so the top two finishers meet Tuesday. Republican Connie Conway, with 35% of the vote, finished first in the six-person primary field. Democrat Lourin Hubbard received 19%. Regardless of who wins - Conway is favored - that person will only be in Congress until the end of the year. Neither of these candidates is on the primary ballot in any district for a full term.

California Primaries

Almost all of the interesting U.S. House primaries are also in California, where  there are quite a few storylines across the state's 52 districts. As with all California primaries, candidates from all parties appear on a single ballot, with the top two advancing to the general election.

See full overview and results on the California Primary Results page.

Mayor

Los Angeles

Four California cities that are among the nation's 100 most populous will elect a mayor this year. The most notable is in Los Angeles, the nation's second largest city. Democratic Mayor Eric Garcetti is ineligible to run due to term limits. There are ten candidates on the ballot. The frontrunners appear to be Rep. Karen Bass (CA-37) and businessman Rick Caruso.

As in other California top two primaries, all candidates from all parties appear together on a single ballot. However, unlike the others, the mayoral primaries are officially nonpartisan, so no party designation is provided. In addition, if a candidate gets a majority of the vote, they are elected.

District Attorney

San Francisco Recall Election

District Attorney Chesa Boudin's job is on the line, as voters will decide whether to recall him. For more background, see our overview of Proposition H.

If 'Yes' is declared the winner, Boudin is recalled.

San Francisco District Attorney Recall Election: Overview and Live Results

Coinciding with Tuesday's California statewide primary, voters in San Francisco will decide on Proposition H. If it passes, District Attorney Chesa Boudin will be recalled.

Boudin, elected in 2019, is part of the 'progressive prosecutor movement'. According to the Wall Street Journal, "Progressive prosecutors have pursued such goals as sending nonviolent drug offenders to treatment instead of jail, sparing juveniles from being prosecuted as adults and spending resources looking at old cases to free wrongfully convicted people from prison."

The effort to remove Boudin grew out of his handling of specific cases, as well as the perception that crime was spiraling out of control. Last fall, recall advocates amassed enough signatures to have the question added to Tuesday's ballot.

The election has divided Democrats in this famously liberal city. However, polling has indicated that Boudin has an uphill fight to keep his job. The most recent survey, from Change Research, showed 56% of voters supported the recall, while 32% were planning to vote against it.

Live results are expected after the polls close at 11:00 PM Eastern Time. Boudin is recalled if 'Yes' is declared the winner. 

If the recall is successful, Mayor London Breed will appoint an interim District Attorney to complete Boudin's term. Who is willing to accept the role may depend on the outcome of another item on the San Francisco ballot, Proposition C. 

Proposition C is designed to limit the number of recall efforts. One of its provisions is that anyone accepting an interim appointment is ineligible to run for a full term in that position. Therefore, anyone considering a 2023 run for District Attorney would likely take themselves out of consideration for what will effectively be a caretaker role.

 

Federal Court Invalidates Louisiana Congressional Map

You only thought congressional redistricting was complete.

Late Monday, a federal court in Louisiana threw out the state's enacted congressional map. The court indicated the plan was in violation of Section 2 of the Voting Rights Act. It ordered the Legislature to draw a new map, that includes a second majority-Black district, by June 20.

The invalidated map was enacted in March when the Republican-controlled Legislature overrode the veto of Democratic Gov. John Bel Edwards. The governor's veto was largely around this same issue, driven by the fact that Blacks comprise about 33% of the state's population. 

The state will appeal.

Live Results: California Congressional and Legislative Special Elections

Coinciding with the California statewide primary, several special elections are being held Tuesday. Separately, is a State Senate special primary in Montana. We've included an overview at the bottom of this page

California polls close at 11:00 PM Eastern Time.

California U.S. Senate (Primary)

Incumbent Alex Padilla (D) was appointed by Gov. Gavin Newsom (D) in January 2021, after Kamala Harris (D) resigned to become Vice-President. However, under a new law, Padilla cannot complete Harris' term as an appointed Senator. As a result, there are two primary elections for Senate on Tuesday's ballot. The regular one for the six-year term beginning in January, 2023, and a special primary for the lame duck session after the November elections.  You can see the results for both on our overview page for all of Tuesday's primaries.

The top two finishers will advance to the November special election.

California U.S. House District 22

This election is to fill the vacancy created when Republican Devin Nunes resigned at the end of last year. No candidate received a majority in the April 5 primary, so the top two finishers meet Tuesday. Republican Connie Conway, with 35% of the vote, finished first in the six-person primary field. Democrat Lourin Hubbard received 19%. Regardless of who wins - Conway is favored - that person will only be in Congress until the end of the year. Neither of these candidates is on the primary ballot in any district for a full term.

California State Assembly

Democrats hold a large majority in the California State Assembly. The party controls 58 seats, alongside 19 Republicans and one independent. Members serve two-year terms. The next regularly scheduled elections will be in November. Primaries for those seats, contested using redistricted boundaries, are part of Tuesday's statewide primary.

Tuesday's special elections will fill the chamber's two vacancies. Polls close at 11:00 PM Eastern Time.

District 62: This coastal Southern California district includes Inglewood and Los Angeles International Airport. Democrat Autumn Burke resigned earlier this year. Four Democrats made up the April 5 all-party primary, with Tina McKinnor (39% of the vote) and Robert Pullen-Miles (35%) advancing.

District 80: This district runs from the Mexico border to San Diego. Democrat Lorena Gonzalez Fletcher resigned in January. There were two Democrats and one Republican on the April 5 all-party primary ballot. Both Democrats advanced, with Georgette Gomez and David Alvarez both getting 38% of the vote (Gomez finished first by 168 votes). This race has drawn some outsized interest as the candidates represent two factions of the state's Democratic politics.

Montana State Senate (Primaries)

Republicans hold 31 of 50 seats in the Montana State Senate. There are 18 Democrats. Members serve four-year, staggered terms, with 25 of the seats up for election this year. Primaries for those seats, contested using redistricted boundaries, are part of Tuesday's statewide primary.

District 15 is located in the central part of the state. Republican Ryan Osmundson resigned in September, 2021, to take a job with Gov. Greg Gianforte (R). Dan Bartel (R), then a State Representative, was appointed to the seat in November to serve through the special election. 

These primaries are contested; Bartel and Democrat Cindy Palmer will advance to the November 8 special election.

Polls close at 10:00 PM Eastern Time.

Live Results: Mayoral Primaries in Four California Cities, Including Los Angeles

Voters in four California cities, all among the nation's 100 most populous,1 1City rankings are based on July 1, 2021 Census Bureau population estimates. They are for the city itself, not the associated metropolitan area.will select nominees for mayor Tuesday.

These are all nonpartisan contests. If a candidate gets a majority of the vote, they are elected. Otherwise, the top two finishers will advance to the November 8 general election. Polls close at 11:00 PM Eastern Time.

Los Angeles

Los Angeles is the 2nd largest city in the United States, with a population of approximately 3,850,000.  The mayor is Democrat Eric Garcetti. Completing his second term, he is ineligible to run due to term limits.

Garcetti was reelected in 2017 with 81% of the vote. Normally a four-year position, Garcia's second term is closer to 5 1/2 years due to a change in election law.

There are 10 candidates on the ballot, although one, Ramit Varma, has withdrawn. The frontrunners appear to be Rep. Karen Bass (CA-37) and businessman Rick Caruso.

Note that Garcetti has been nominated to become Ambassador to India. While the Foreign Relations Committee advanced him in January, the full Senate hasn't acted on it. Should he be confirmed before the end of his term, the City Council will appoint an interim mayor to complete it.

San Jose

San Jose is the 10th largest city in the United States, with a population of just under one million.  The mayor is Democrat Sam Liccardo. Completing his second term, he is ineligible to run due to term limits.

There are four notable candidates on the ballot. Cindy Chavez is president of the Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors. Dev Davis, Matt Mahan, and Raul Peralez are all members of the City Council.

Long Beach

Long Beach is the 43rd largest city in the United States, with a population of 456,000. The mayor is Democrat Robert Garcia, who is not seeking reelection; he is on the ballot today as a candidate for California's 42nd congressional district.

There are six candidates on the ballot

Chula Vista

Chula Vista is the 77th largest city in the United States, with a population of just over 275,000. The mayor is Democrat Mary Salas. Completing her second term, she is ineligible to run due to term limits.

There are six candidates on the ballot.

New York Rep. Chris Jacobs Abandons Reelection Bid

New York Republican Rep. Chris Jacobs (NY-27) announced Friday that he was ending his campaign for reelection. Jacobs had received an intense backlash from within the party for his willingness to support gun control in the wake of the mass shooting at the Tops Market in Buffalo, a short distance from his district.

The Buffalo News attributed this quote to Jacobs: "This obviously arises out of last Friday, my remarks, statements on being receptive to gun controls. And since that time, every Republican elected (official) that had endorsed me withdrew their endorsement. Party officials that supported me withdrew, most of them, and those that were going to said they would not. And so obviously, this was not well received by the Republican base."

Jacobs is completing his first full term. He was first elected in a 2020 special election to fill the vacancy left when Republican Chris Collins resigned. He is the 53rd current House member that will be retiring this year. This includes members running for another office, as well as those that have lost in their party's primary. 

As New York is losing a House seat this year, his current 27th district was eliminated in redistricting. Jacobs had been planning to run in the new District 23, a safely Republican district that primarily includes areas to the south of his current district, continuing to the Pennsylvania border.

New Hampshire Redistricting Complete; Final Shapes Added to Interactive Map


Locate and view your new congressional district. Result includes a side by side map comparison of how the district shape will change. Not yet available for Missouri, New Hampshire, or New York.


Earlier this week, the New Hampshire Supreme Court adopted the congressional redistricting plan submitted by its special master, Nathaniel Persily. The court's action came after the legislature and Gov. Chris Sununu were unable to agree on a new map. 

According to New Hampshire NPR, "The map approved by the court uses a “least change” approach, moving just five towns —Jackson, Albany, Sandwich, Campton and New Hampton — from the 1st District into the 2nd District in order to achieve a balanced population." 

With little geographic change, the partisan lean of the two districts is unchanged; both districts remain highly competitive. This is the outcome desired by the governor. The legislature had sought to make each district more partisan, improving the likelihood of a GOP pick-up in District 1.

The shapes have been added to the 2022 House Interactive Map. The map for 2022 is now complete, barring any changes ordered as a result of active litigation. Given calendar realities, it is becoming less likely that any of those efforts will affect the maps in place for this year's elections.

The current consensus map is below. There are no forecaster ratings yet for New Hampshire. Those districts are shown as a dark gray but are editable. Click the image to create and share your 2022 House forecast.

 

 

 

House Update: Redistricting, Consensus and Competitive Maps, Retirements and Vacancies

Redistricting


Locate and view your new congressional district. Result includes a side by side map comparison of how the district shape will change. Not yet available for Missouri, New Hampshire, or New York.


New Hampshire is the only state without an active map. The latest proposal was approved by the Legislature; Gov. Chris Sununu has not indicated if he will sign it. The Legislature and Governor have been at odds, with Sununu preferring both districts be competitive, as has been the case in the past. The Legislature is attempting to make both district more partisan, to increase the likelihood of a GOP victory in District 1. The State Supreme Court has also weighed in, imposing a June 1 deadline after which the justices will draw the maps.

Litigation remains active in some other states, most notably in Florida. Given calendar realities, it is becoming less likely that any of those efforts will affect the maps in place for this year's elections.

Consensus Map

With New York redistricting complete, forecasters are issuing their initial ratings. The Consensus Map has been updated to reflect these changes.

Competitive Map

We have a blank 2022 map, for those that want to build a forecast from scratch. In the Competitive Map, districts are shown as red or blue except where one or more forecasters has rated the district as something other than 'safe'. As of now, 96 of the 433 districts with ratings fall in that category. These range from true toss-ups to those just barely on the competitive radar. New Hampshire will likely add one or two more, depending on where the line is drawn

Retirements

52 current members of the House - 33 Democrats and 19 Republicans - will not be standing for reelection in November.  17 of those are running for another office, while four have been defeated in party primaries. Click on the map below to see the full list.

Vacancy and Special Election

There are currently 220 Democrats and 208 Republicans in the House, along with seven vacancies.

District Party* Primary General Notes
AK-AL R June 11 August 16 Don Young died in April. About 50 candidates will be on the all-party primary ballot. The top four will advance to the general, which will be conducted using ranked choice voting.
CA-22 R April 5 June 7 Connie Conway (R, 35% of the vote) and Lourin Hubbard (D, 19%) advanced from the all-party primary.
MN-1 R May 24 August 9 Jim Hagedorn died in February. Brad Finstad (R) and Jeff Ettinger (D) won their respective party primaries.
NE-1 R   June 28 Jeff Fortenberry resigned in March. The parties directly nominated Mike Flood (R) and Patty Brooks (D)
NY-19 D   August 23 Anthony Delgado resigned May 25 to become Lt. Gov. of New York. Nominees will be selected directly by the parties.
NY-23 R   August 23 Tom Reed resigned earlier in May. Nominees will be selected directly by the parties.
TX-34 D   June 14 Filemon Vela resigned in March. Two Democrats and two Republicans are on the all-party ballot. If no candidate gets a majority, a runoff will be held at a later date.

* Party of prior incumbent

Overview & Live Results: Primary Day in Georgia, Alabama, and Arkansas; Runoff Elections in Texas

Georgia, Alabama, and Arkansas hold primaries Tuesday. These are all runoff states; the top two finishers will advance to a June 21 runoff if no candidate gets a majority of the vote. Separately, Texas holding runoff elections from the March 1 primary

On this page, we'll highlight and provide results for some of the most compelling contests. Use the links below to see all results. Latest poll closing (Eastern Time) appears below the state name. If you are voting in one of these states, check with your polling place as the hours may differ.

Alabama >> Arkansas >> Georgia >> Texas >> 
8:00 PM  8:30 PM 7:00 PM 8:00 PM*

*Mountain Time Zone locations close at 9:00 PM Eastern

There are also two state legislative special elections and a primary for the vacancy in Minnesota's First Congressional District

State Legislative >> MN-01 Special Primary >>

While you're awaiting the results, check out our new feature that lets you view the congressional district - before and after redistricting - for any U.S. street address. 


U.S. Senate

Alabama (Republican)

The seat will almost certainly remain in Republican control, so all the action is around who the nominee will be. Sen. Richard Shelby is not seeking a 7th term. He has endorsed his former Chief of Staff, Katie Britt. The other prominent names on the ballot are Rep. Mo Brooks (AL-05) and businessman Michael Durant.

None of the three has cleared 40% in this frequently-polled race, so a June top two runoff seems likely. Donald Trump unendorsed Brooks in March, saying he had gone "woke", although the fact that the candidate was sinking in the polls likely was a contributing factor. However, Brooks has seen a resurgence in the campaign's closing weeks, leaving it very much up in the air which two candidates will advance.

Georgia (Republican)

Freshman Democratic Sen. Raphael Warnock, who won a special election in 2020, is seeking his first full six-year term. He faces only a nominal primary challenge before moving on to what is expected to be a competitive general election. 

Entering the race with high name recognition from his days as a star running back for the University of Georgia, as well as an endorsement from Donald Trump, political newcomer Herschel Walker has run far ahead of other candidates for the Republican nomination.

Some in the party are concerned Walker will not make a good general election candidate. To that end, a pair of Republican super PACs set a plan in early April to spend millions attacking Walker in the hope of keeping him below 50%, forcing a runoff. It doesn't look like that effort will be successful; Walker had 66% support in a Fox News poll released last week.

Governor

Alabama (Republican)

Gov. Kay Ivey has drawn eight primary challengers as she seeks a second full term. Despite being solidly conservative, she is facing attacks from opponents positioning themselves even further to the right. The New York Times reported that "Ivey opened herself up to a primary challenge in part by extending a mask mandate in the spring of 2021, when many fellow G.O.P. governors were lifting them."

There's little doubt the winner of the Republican primary here will be elected in November. There's also little doubt Ivey will finish first on Tuesday. What isn't known is whether Ivey will get a majority of the vote and, if she doesn't, who will her opponent be in a June runoff?

The battle for second place appears to be between businessman Tim James, who is the son of former Gov. Fob James, and Lynda Blanchard, former Ambassador to Slovenia. In the final Real Clear Politics average, Ivey had 49%, followed by James with 18% and Blanchard at 14%.

Georgia (Republican)

Gov. Brian Kemp is seeking a second term. He has drawn a primary challenge from former Sen. David Purdue, recruited into the race and endorsed by Donald Trump.

While Purdue has the backing of the former president, not much else has gone well. Kemp is going to finish first, the only question is whether he'll clear 50% to avoid a June runoff.  In the final Real Clear Politics average, Kemp held a 55% to 35% lead.

Secretary of State

Georgia (Both)

This race has taken on a national profile. The incumbent Republican, Brad Raffensperger drew the ire of Donald Trump for declining to help him find the votes needed to overturn the state's 2020 vote for Joe Biden. Trump recruited Rep. Jody Hice (GA-10) to get his revenge.

The only recent public poll, released yesterday by Landmark Communications, showed the race a dead heat. Hice had 39% support, Raffensperger 38%. Notably, both candidates were well below the 50% needed to avoid a runoff.  

The Democratic primary is also of interest, as the general election is seen as competitive. There are five candidates vying for the nomination. State Rep. Bee Nguyen has received most of the endorsements. However, none of the candidates appear well known. In a late April SurveyUSA poll, Nguyen 'led' with 12%, with the other four ranging from 6% to 9%. A full 60% were undecided.

Attorney General

Texas Runoff (Republican)

Ken Paxton is seeking a third term. Despite his legal challenges, He finished first, with 43% of the vote, in the March 1 primary. Land Commissioner George P. Bush, the only member of his dynastic political family now holding public office, finished second with 23%. 

U.S. House

Aside from the below, there are a number of other interesting primaries and runoffs due to retirements or redistricting. Check the full state results linked at the top of this page.

Texas District 28 Runoff (Democratic)

In the March primary - a rematch from 2020 - Rep. Henry Cuellar narrowly led his more progressive challenger, Jessica Cisneros by 49% to 47%. The runoff has drawn increased attention with the leak of a Supreme Court's draft opinion in a closely-watched abortion rights case. Cuellar is the only House Democrat that opposes abortion.

Georgia District 7 (Democratic)

Home to one of the nation's most competitive races in recent cycles, redistricting has made this suburban Atlanta district safely Democratic. At the same time, neighboring District 6 was made safe for the GOP. This has led to a 'win or go home' primary between incumbent Carolyn Bourdeaux and Lucy McBath (current GA-06).

Georgia District 14 (Republican)

Controversial freshman Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene has drawn several primary opponents. The most formidable is businesswoman Jennifer Strahan. There hasn't been any recent polling here. Strahan will try and hold Taylor Greene under 50% to force a June runoff.

The nominee will be heavily favored in the general election.

Upcoming

  • June 7
    • California Primary
    • Iowa Primary
    • Mississippi Primary
      • Runoffs, where necessary, on June 28
    • Montana Primary
    • New Jersey Primary
    • New Mexico Primary
    • South Dakota Primary
    • California Congressional District 22 Special Election
    • California State Assembly Districts 62 & 80 Special Election
    • Montana State Senate District 15 Special Primary
    • California Mayoral Primaries: Los Angeles, San Jose, Long Beach, Chula Vista
  • June 11
    • Alaska Congressional At-Large District Special Primary