Lindsey Graham Exits 2016 Race

December 21, 2015

South Carolina Senator Lindsey Graham suspended his presidential campaign Monday, Politico reports. Today was the final day for Graham to remove himself from the ballot for the February 20 South Carolina Republican primary. Graham was only averaging 1.8% in his home state, good for a distant 9th in the then 14-person race. Graham's national poll numbers were even worse, averaging less than 1%. As such, he could never crack the main debate stage, which limited his ability to gain exposure.

The Politico article notes that Graham now has an opportunity to be kingmaker in South Carolina, giving him a chance to be more vocal about his opposition to Donald Trump and fellow Senator Ted Cruz.

Suspending a Campaign vs. Ending It

If you've ever wondered why candidates 'suspend' their campaigns instead of just declaring them over, it mostly boils down to two things. First, in the unlikely event that the world changes, it is easier to revive the campaign. However, the main reason is that it takes a while to wind down a campaign, paying off bills/debts etc. This article from 2012 discusses some of this in a bit more detail.

comments powered by Disqus

Headlines

Primary Recap: Marshall Wins GOP Senate Nomination in Kansas; Two House Members Ousted

Kansas Republicans opted for nominees with better general election prospects, while a dynastic Missouri Democratic congressman was defeated

Five States Hold Primaries; All Eyes on GOP Senate Contest in Kansas

After a two week break, August 4 brings us primaries in Arizona, Kansas, Michigan, Missouri and Washington

The Road to 270: Maine

Biden is likely to prevail here, but a competitive electoral vote available in the state's 2nd congressional district - won by Trump in 2016 - will draw considerable attention.

Simulator Enhancements: Bellwether and Tipping Point Frequencies Added

See how often a state votes with the election winner and also which states most frequently put the winner across the 270 electoral vote threshold.

The Road to 270: Colorado

Reliably Republican at the presidential level through most of the 20th century, it has voted Democratic since 2008 and looks fairly safe for Joe Biden in 2020